CONFERENCE SESSIONS

Check back for schedule updates and announcements, as additional speakers and panelists are being confirmed. Workshops marked with an asterisk (*) require advanced registration. Register here.


Monday, October 10, 2011

LEVERAGE: Strengthening Neighborhoods Through Design [Welcome Address]
Time: 8:30 – 9:15am 
Venue: Grand Ballroom
Panel: Alan Greenberger, Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development, City of Philadelphia; Sally Harrison, Temple University; Don Matzkin, Community Design Collaborative; Elizabeth Miller, Community Design Collaborative; Todd Woodward, SMP Architects; Jess Zimbabwe, The Urban Land Institute

The Community Design Collaborative celebrates two decades of providing pro bono preliminary design services to nonprofit organizations in the Philadelphia region. Join leading design thinkers who contributed essays to a collaborative book on the designer’s role as advocate and policymaker, the future of design activism, and its impact on design excellence in Philadelphia.


Talking Architecture
Time: 10.30 - 11.30am
Venue: Grand Ballroom
Panel: Charles Birnbaum, The Cultural Landscape Foundation; Julie Iovine, The Architect’s Newspaper; Roman Mars, 99% Invisible; Dan Pitera, Detroit Collaborative Design Center, University of Detroit Mercy; Harris Steinberg, Penn Praxis

We consider some of our community’s best responses to the old saw: “it’s not what you say, but how you say it.” A radio producer, a blogger, a critic, a university official… this mix will create an intriguing conversation on participatory design to get synapses firing. Listen to great stories and grab tips to bring into your own work.


Why Then? Why Now? Community + Design
Time: 10.30 - 11.30am  
Venue: Crystal Ballroom
Panel: Sheri Blake, University of Manitoba; Sharon Haar, University of Illinois at Chicago; David Perkes, Gulf Coast Community Design Studio; Quilian Riano, DSGN AGNC; Anthony Schuman, New Jersey Institute of Technology

Is the resurgence of interest in community design and social justice and humanitarian responsibility a convenient dodge from the realities of the economy and the shrinking of our profession, or are we on to something bigger? This session is intended to open productive conversations on community design roots and the past practice trends that
inform present architecture activism work.

Noon Session

Where If Not Us? Participatory Design and its Radical Approaches: A Visual Journey
Time: 12.00 - 1.00pm Venue: Chestnut Room
Panel: Mathias Heyden, Institute of Architecture,Technical University, Berlin; Ines Schaber, Artist, Photographer, and Author

Taking up research by Mathias Heyden on community design that uncovered significant questions about the politics of image-making, this project aims to develop a form for visual research that could become part of a progressive future of such architecture/planning. It reflects upon the making of particular community design projects in dialogue with those involved, considering usage and appropriation over time.


Breakout Sessions - Round 1

Mixplace Studio
Time: 1.15 - 2.15pm
Venue: Grand Ballroom
Panel: Teddy Cruz, Estudio Teddy Cruz; Aaron Levy, Slought Foundation; Kira Strong, People’s Emergency Center

Mixplace Studio brings a cultural group into working connections with acclaimed designers and a respected social service provider, jointly establishing a youth mentorship initiative, along with design-related research and exhibitions for jumpstarting community discussion. This session will explore neighborhood revitalization through multi-layered partnerships and long-term commitments with cultural organizations.


Curating Your Architecture Festival
Time: 1.15 - 2.15pm
Venue: Crystal Ballroom
Panel: Kyle Bergman, Architecture and Design Film Festival; Thaddeus Squire Hidden City Philadelphia

Designing a festival is like designing a building. A balance of art and science, desire and budget, and it has to work on many scales to fulfill a concept. This session will enumerate the essential partners, and programming and funding considerations for planning festival events, and how volunteer teams can manage an inclusive vision.


Rural Community Collaborations
Time: 1.15 - 2.15pm
Venue: Chestnut Room
Panel: Marsha Cuddeback, Office of Community Design and Development-Louisiana State University; Brian Morton, Center for Urban and Regional Studies-University of North Carolina; Scott Penman + John Poros, Carl Small Town Center-Mississippi State University; Dewey

Participate in an exploration of the links between agriculture, sustainability, regional land use planning, transit, and economic development, and their implications for rural communities. The discussion will engage work in rural areas all across the globe, grappling with various aspects of the rural sustainability question from a community design and research perspective.


What’s the Big Idea?
Time: 1.15 - 2.15pm
Venue: Chancellor Room
Panel: Christopher Lawrence, HIVE Learning Network NYC; Helen Wechsler, Institute of Museum and Library Services

We have welcomed representatives from top philanthropies to come speak about the large voids and opportunities their organizations view as critical to the future success of their grantees. Hear directly from those shaping grant-driven programs, and what they see as prime openings for architectural organizations and educators.


Breakout Sessions - Round 2

Innovative Approaches to Community Building
Time: 2.30 – 3.30pm
Venue: Grand Ballroom
Panel: Brandy Brooks, The Food Project; Marilyn Jackson, Chicago Architecture Foundation; Sarah Malin, Cannon Design; Kevin Singh, Community Design Action Center; Suzanne Wedekind, West Valley Middle School, Knoxville, TN; Teyonda Wertz, South Shore Chamber, Inc.

From new and creative ways to bring communities together to making the old new again, this session features innovative teachers, artists, and practitioners striving to redraw relationships for community building.


Bridging the Gap: Public-Interest Architectural Internships
Time: 2.30 – 3.30pm
Venue: Crystal Ballroom
Panel: Georgia Bizios + Katie Wakeford, North Carolina State University; Gabe Bergeron, Gateway Initiative-Boston Architectural College; Mami Hara, Wallace, Roberts & Todd; Ceara O’Leary, buildingcommunity WORKSHOP; Jess Zimbabwe, The Urban Land Institute

Contributors and programs from the publication, Bridging the Gap, will participate in a panel bringing together the best in current thinking regarding public interest architectural internships, and advocating for profound change in the profession and communities.


Pairing Youth with Mentors and Digital Media
Time: 2.30 – 3.30pm
Venue: Chestnut Room
Panel: Joe Cliggott, Rafael Viñoly Architects; Jennifer Masengarb, Chicago Architecture Foundation; Gregory Simon, Academy of Architecture and Contemporary Themes

The latest Chicago Architecture Foundation initiative, DiscoverDesign.org, connects public schools with architecture professionals to promote classroom ecology in the virtual realm. Join a discussion-based session on anticipating and managing social networking tools with youth, including adventures in teaching the design process in a digital setting.


Healthy Communities Through Design
Time: 2.30 – 3.30pm
Venue: Chancellor Room
Panel: Rick Bell, AIA New York; Sean Fischer, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

AIA New York has worked with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to investigate connections between design of the built environment and physical activity, including City-wide adoption of Active Design Guidelines. This session will explore the health basis of Active Design, and consider the collaborative opportunities in your community.


Breakout Sessions - Round 3

What Went Wrong? Lessons in Failure + Response 
Time: 3.45 – 4.45pm
Venue: Grand Ballroom
Panel: Monica Chadha, Converge:Exchange; Anne Frederick, Hester Street Collaborative; Christine Gaspar, Center for Urban Pedagogy; Peter Kountz, Charter High School for Architecture; Mike Newman, Shed Studio; Quilian Riano, DSGN AGNC

Failure is a part of design. That’s a fact. No matter the amount of planning, the outcome still didn’t go the way you planned. Come engage in an honest discussion about overcoming failure in the public interest realm. Hear how several widely recognized professionals have addressed project failures, recovered, and have begun creating new models for working in their communities.


Community Design In Action 
Time: 3.45 – 4.45pm
Venue: Crystal Ballroom
Panel: Sally Harrison, Temple University; Craig Huebner, Community Design Solutions; Anne-Marie Lubenau, Loeb Fellow, Harvard Graduate School of Design; Ceara O’Leary, buildingcommunityWORKSHOP; Hideaki Shimura, Shibaura Institute of Technology

This session will cover a range of projects and issues that design centers navigate at a variety of scales aiming to explore the challenges of public design practices and how they engage the communities in which they work.


Sacred Spaces: Faith-Based Community Design
Time: 3.45 – 4.45pm
Venue: Chestnut Room
Panel: David Brawer, Brawer & Hauptman Architects; Tuomi Forrest, Partners for Sacred Places; John Hubert, John Hubert Architects; Sister Ann Provost, Mercy Neighborhood Ministries; Bill Singer, Environmental Works

As we continue to grapple with how to provide the most value with limited funds, these four projects highlight different processes for working with religious organizations in various applications from transitional housing to new spaces facilitating outreach and school programs.


Build It!
Time: 3.45 – 5.30pm
Venue: Center for Architecture (Hands-On Workshop) Limited to 35 participants. Advance Registration Required.
Panel: Alex Gilliam, Public Workshop

Engaging communities in building can be a powerful tool for initiating dialogues, fostering meaningful collaborations, exploring complex ideas, and identifying new possibilities. In this entertaining workshop, you’ll transform a space by building things, very big things. Learn new fundamental approaches that rethink how to teach, talk, and engage people in design.


Central Delaware Riverfront Planning Development
Time: 3.45 – 5.30pm
Venue: Meet on mezzanine level (Mobile Workshop) Limited to 40 participants. Advance Registration Required.
Panel: Tammy Leigh DeMent, Pennsylvania Horticultural Society; Andrew Goodman + Harris Steinberg, Penn Praxis; Rene Goodwin + Steve Weixler, Central Delaware Advocacy Group; Sarah Thorp, Delaware River Waterfront Corporation

Participate in an on-site tour focused on current design efforts to overhaul Philadelphia’s riverfront through local collaboration between Penn Praxis, the Delaware River Waterfront Corporation, and The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society.


Mural Arts at the Gallery
Time: 3.45 – 5.30pm
Venue: Meet on mezzanine level (Mobile Workshop) Limited to 40 participants. Advanced Registration Required.
Panel: Ryan Derfler, City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program

Join us for a mobile workshop highlighting the remarkable work of the largest public art program in the US. See how Mural Arts is opening up art relationships to full public view, sparking greater public interest. Gain inspiration are more know-how on ways arts and culture projects can revitalize communities and spaces.


ACD Members Meeting
Time: 5.00 – 5.30pm
Venue: Crystal Ballroom
Annual program update for current dues-paying members of the Association for Community Design.


Evening Keynote Address

Creative Acts of Citizenship: The Neighborhood as Site of Production
Time: 5.30 – 7.30pm
Venue: Friends Center | 1501 Cherry Street
Panel: Teddy Cruz

Winner of the prestigious Rome Prize for architectural research, Guatemalan-born Cruz is a tireless advocate, designer, and urban theorist. Through such work he has become a leading fixture in designing for under-served populations, concentrating the bulk of his efforts on mixed-use and affordable housing developments along the Tijuana-San Diego border. His firm, Estudio Teddy Cruz, has pioneered inventive public engagement efforts to knit together these bi-cultural communities, and in the process reveal how design can positively shape peoples’ lives. Cruz will share insights on the strategies and research that fuels his firm’s work, and how we can all respond creatively to an increasingly interconnected world.


Tuesday, October 11

AAO Members Meeting
Time: 7.15 – 7.45am
Venue: Crystal Ballroom
Annual program update for current dues-paying members of the Association of Architecture Organizations (organizations and individuals).


Public Interest Practice in Architecture: A 2011 AIA Latrobe Prize Dialogue
Time: 8.00 - 9.00am
Venue: Grand Ballroom
Panel: Catherine Baker, Landon Bone Baker Architects; Roberta Feldman, University of Illinois at Chicago; David Perkes, Gulf Coast Community Design Studio; Dan Pitera, Detroit Collaborative Design Center, University of Detroit Mercy

Join 2011 AIA Latrobe Prize recipients Roberta Feldman and David Perkes for a discussion of their “Public Interest Practice in Architecture” research. With special guests Catherine Baker and Dan Pitera, the panel discusses their findings and how client driven professionals can learn from the needs-driven segment of architectural practice.
Ultimately, the Prize recipients ask: what is necessary for public interest work to become a significant segment of architectural practice?


Breakout Sessions – Round 1

Of Mutual Benefit? Participatory Design + Service Learning
Time: 9.15 – 10.15am
Venue: Grand Ballroom
Panel: Natalia Anderson, Iowa State University; Sheri Blake, University of Manitoba; Thomas Davis, University of Tennessee-Knoxville; Jeffrey Hou, University of Washington; Edward Orlowski, Lawrence Technological University

This session highlights multiple studio case studies to guide larger discussion about the learning outcomes and challenges in pursuing participatory community design work, as well as opportunities to connect in meaningful ways outside the classroom.


National Endowment for the Arts: Grant Workshop
Time: 9.15 – 10.15am
Venue: Grand Ballroom
Panel: Jen Hughes and Jason Schupbach, National Endowment for the Arts

Jen Hughes and Jason Schupbach, National Endowment for the Arts The NEA is coming out of an intense period of research and data gathering, some of which has influenced changes to its program guidelines. This session reviews the updates and uses the information as a starting place to explore ways the NEA can better support
the work of its grantees.


Sustainable Native Communities Initiative
Time: 9.15 – 10.15am
Venue: Grand Ballroom
Panel: Peter Aeschbacher, Penn State University; Jamie Blosser, Sustainable Native Communities Initiative; Daniel Glenn, Glenn & Glenn Architects/Engineers, PLLC; Joseph Kunkel, Ayers Saint Gross Architects

The Sustainable Native Communities Collaborative is a group of community designers who are all invested in affordable housing and sustainable projects in Native American communities. Reviewing outcomes from interactive workshops conducted in community settings and the documentation of several case studies, this session will explore what
best practices are emerging for long-term sustainable development in Native communities nationwide.


Emerging Design Collaborations
Time: 9.15 – 10.15am
Venue: Chancellor Room
Panel: Katie Koch + Carmen Dukes, Project Interaction; Joseph Krupczynski, Moveable Feast; Lucy Begg, Thoughtbarn

This session highlights captivating projects that are catapulting design into new territories and new funding arrangements. Learn what these emerging organizations are finding to be the best opportunities from start-up
businesses empowering underserved populations to strategies for self-generating funds to underwrite design education outreach to visions for entire revitalization of local communities.


Breakout Sessions – Round 2

10 Years of Learning: The Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellowship
Time: 10.30 – 11.30am
Venue: Grand Ballroom
Panel: Theresa Hwang, Current Rose Fellow: Skid Row Housing Trust; Daniel Splaingard, Current Rose Fellow: Bickerdike Redevelopment Corporation; Katie Swenson + Trinity Simons, Enterprise Community Partners; Jess Zimbabwe, The Urban Land Institute

The Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellowship has cultivated a new generation of community-based architects creating sustainable communities for all income levels. Together with previous fellows, the Rose staff will share fellowship stories of challenges and opportunities sure to impact community design over the next decade.


Managing Finances in a Changed Economy
Time: 10.30 – 11.30am
Venue: Crystal Ballroom
Panel: Alice Richardson Antonelli, Nonprofit Finance Fund

The Nonprofit Finance Fund provides nonprofit leaders with guidance and tools to manage through challenging times. This session is designed to increase one’s financial IQ, providing a few budget testing exercises and scenario planning ideas to deliver your organization to a more planful state. The session ends by introducing some intermediate level content to assist with program profitability assessments and clearer communication to key stakeholders about an organization’s true financial costs.


Locating Education Partners: Science + Math
Time: 10.30 – 11.30am
Venue: Chestnut Room
Panel: Roxanne Mejia, Salvadori Center; Anna Sanko, Architecture Resource Center

Learn the partnership connections of two architecture education programs delivering STEM content: a public school district supported in-school program, and an after-school project conducted with a public housing authority and funded by the National Science Foundation. This session will examine how these partnerships took hold, and what deliverables really sealed the deal.


Stone Soup: Recipes for Design Engagement
Time: 10.30 – 11.30am
Venue: Chancellor Room
Panel: Caryn Brause + Michael Di Pasquale + Frank Sleggers, UMASS Amherst Design Center; Joseph Krupcynski, Center for Design Engagement

Dig in to a series of presentations from two design centers that have emerged from the University of Massachusetts. These two case studies will provide a discussion of priorities, pedagogy, and partnerships with citizens, the university, and community organizations. Hear reflections on developing future opportunities and creating a sustainable design center.


Urban Infill: Connelly House
Time: 10.30 – 12.00pm
Venue: Meet at mezzanine level (Mobile Workshop) Limited to 20 participants. Advanced Registration Required.
Panel: Heidi Segall Levy, Community Design Collaborative; Carolyn Placke + Alison Taylor, Project H.O.M.E.; Morrie Zimmerman, BWA Architecture + Planning

Connelly House is an innovative venture by Project H.O.M.E., the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, and Bethesda Project to help meet the needs of the homeless and low-and moderate-income residents. Take a tour of this eight story, multi-use building which provides 79 units of affordable, supportive housing facilities in the heart of Center City.
story with others.


Noon Session

Bridging Waters: Creating a Peace Park on the River Jordan
Time: 12.00 – 1.00pm
Venue: Chestnut Room
Panel: Film Screening (approx. 30 minutes), followed by Q&A with Alan Plattus, Yale University

For one week in May 2008, leading architects from Yale University traveled to the Jordan- Israel border in order to work with Israeli, Jordanian, and Palestinian architects and to help design the first Peace Park in the Middle East. Two Yale undergraduates followed the group with a camera in attempts to capture this significant moment and share this unique
story with others.


Gritty + Groundbreaking: Green + Affordable Housing in North Philadelphia
Time: 12.00 – 1.00pm
Venue: Meet at mezzanine level (Mobile Workshop) Limited to 37 participants. Advance Registration Required.
Panel: Linda Dottor, Community Design Collaborative; Daryn Edwards, Interface Studio Architects; David Elliot, Pennsylvania Horticultural Society; Rose Gray, APM; Bob Grossmann, Pennsylvania Horticultural Society; Scott Ritchie, SMP Architects; Shanta Schachter, New Kensington Community Development Corporation

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society’s Philadelphia Green program has used horticulture to build community and improve Philadelphians’ quality of life. Learn about Philadelphia Green’s role in the Big Green Block, Liberty Lands, and other neighborhood assets, and visit innovative affordable housing that got its start through pro bono pre-design services from the Community Design Collaborative.


Breakout Sessions – Round 3

Lasting Impressions: The Not-So-Fleeting Impact of Pop Up Urbanism
Time: 1.15 – 2.15pm
Venue: Grand Ballroom
Panel: David Belt, Macro Sea; Katherine Darnstadt, Architecture for Humanity-Chicago; Benje Feehan, buildingcommunity WORKSHOP; David Jurca, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative-Kent State University; Scott Kratz, National Building Museum

Pop-Up Urbanism is increasingly being used to experiment with various opportunities for the public to engage with design proposals in more tangible and meaningful ways to resolve difficult issues. Learn how temporary interventions can be an effective strategy for testing urban design proposals before long-term investments are made.


Contributing from a Distance? Discussing the Value of Humanitarian Design
Time: 1.15 – 2.15pm
Venue: Crystal Ballroom
Panel: Julie Beckman, Kaseman Beckman Advanced Strategies; Sheri Blake, University of Manitoba; John Comazzi, University of Minnesota; Brian Phillips, Interface Studio Architects

Following the natural disasters of the past decade, there has been a renewed interest in designing for those in need globally. This begs the question: how can design contribute at a distance in humanitarian relief? This session will explore the complexities of working, collaborating, and coordinating the value of that contribution through scaled case studies.


City Leadership and Urban Design
Time: 1.15 – 2.15pm
Venue: Chestnut Room
Panel: Story Bellows, Mayors’ Institute on City Design; Ronald E. Bogle, American Architectural Foundation; Graham Stroh, Great Schools by Design

The American Architectural Foundation educates leaders about the value of design in an ever changing world. During this session, investigate three American Architectural Foundation programs and hear how connections were forged between city leadership and urban design. Learn proven strategies for getting schools, publicprivate partnerships, and political leaders to actively shape our public spaces with an appreciation for best practice.


Breakout Sessions – Round 4

The Architecture of the Brain and What it Might Tell Us about What Should Happen in Learning
Time: 2.30 – 3.30pm
Venue: Grand Ballroom
Panel: David Ghoogasian, The Lyceum

When we address new groups of learners, we often do so with some trepidation. We realize opportunities to raise interest and inspire, we confront challenges of conveying meaning and sustaining learners’ interest. Help can be found by deepening our understanding of the structures and inner workings of the brain. This session will outline some of what neuroscience, cognitive science, psychology, education, and experience might suggest is happening when learners acquire knowledge.


Rethinking Collaboration
Time: 2.30 – 3.30pm
Venue: Crystal Ballroom
Panel: Victoria Chanse, University of Maryland; Vivian Figueredo, OMG Center; Sohyun Park, Seoul National University; Harris Steinberg, Penn Praxis; Linda Sylvan, Rice Design Alliance

From successes and failures, this session focuses on new partnerships with public agencies and considers how existing assets might be redesigned to spark community revitalization. These engrossing case studies can inspire you to reimagine your organization’s partnership strategies.


Corridor Stories: Examining Non-Profit Driven Revitalization of Commercial Corridors
Time: 2.30 – 3.30pm
Venue: Chestnut Room
Panel: Robin Kohles, Community Design Collaborative; Diana Nicholas, Drexel University; Katie Winkler, Better Block Philly

The re-emergence of commercial corridors as the engine of change and growth in the city has spawned a variety of options for refreshing these spaces. This presentation will examine the outcomes, roadblocks, and successes in Philadelphia efforts designed around helping individual vendors and their respective CDC’s affect change and make
improvements to their physical facades.


SEED: Tools for Shaping and Assessing Community-Centered Design Projects
Time: 2.30 – 3.30pm
Venue: Chancellor Room
Panel: Lisa Abendroth, SEED Network

This workshop will introduce SEED, a national network that provides tools for designers who are focused on an enhanced ethical and sustainable public interest design framework. A demonstration of projects currently using the SEED Evaluator will offer concrete metrics for integrated design practices with SEED and how to communicate
outcomes to stakeholders.


Breakout Sessions – Round 5

Sewing Community Education into Practice
Time: 3.45 – 4.45pm
Venue: Grand Ballroom
Panel: Catherine Baker, Landon Bone Baker Architects; Anne Frederick, Hester Street Collaborative; Brian Phillips, Interface Studio Architects; Bill Singer, Environmental Works

How does community education find a home within architectural firms? What starts the process, where does it wind up, and why? How can you or your organization get involved? Design in Action is the perfect setting for an investigation of these interdisciplinary pursuits, as the panelists discuss these topics and several models of practice/community projects.


Architecture Education: K-12 Learning Guidelines
Time: 3.45 – 4.45pm
Venue: Crystal Ballroom
Panel: Kelly Lyons, Carnegie Mellon University

Kelly Lyons shared details last year on a project that would posit which common academic concepts in architecture education programs might reasonably be expected to be acquired by students at each grade level along the primary and secondary school progression. A year later, this session examines the short list of core concepts and learning areas against which the K-12 learning goals framework will be based.


National Endowment for the Arts: Impact of Design Audit
Time: 3.45 – 4.45pm
Venue: Chestnut Room
Panel:
Jason Schupbach, National Endowment for the Arts

NEA Design Director Jason Schupbach shares insights on the agency’s many programs for design-related organizations, including future NEA plans balanced with current budgetary challenges. Join in an update on NEA collaborations with other federal departments and relevant research being conducted on creative place-making issues and community livability standards.


From Planning to Action: Combating Vacancy + Abandonment through Collaboration
Time:
3.45 – 4.45pm
Venue:
Chancellor Room
Panel:
Jill Feldstein, Women’s Community Revitalization Project; Mindy Watts, Interface Studios LLC

Communities all over the country are grappling with solutions to vacant land and abandoned buildings. Focusing on engaging community residents and neighborhood based organizations in interactive land use and action planning, this session will provide instruction to practitioners looking to build and strengthen such communities through collaboration.


Closing Session

What Will You Do Differently Tomorrow?
Time:
4.45 – 5.30pm
Venue:
Grand Ballroom
Panel:
Brandy Brooks, The Food Project; John Claypool, Philadelphia Center for Architecture; Katherine Darnstadt, Architecture for Humanity-Chicago (invited); Alex Gilliam, Public Workshop; Diana Lind, Next American City

Next American City Editor Diana Lind moderates the conference finale, bringing together a collection of emerging voices from the public interest arena. Hear their votes on conference highlights and important lessons learned. How do they see their work changing and evolving in the near future? Who do they want to collaborate with, and why? Before we all head home, comes this important opportunity for you to compare notes with these fellow conference delegates.

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